The first stage of market planning involves sales projections and evaluations of past promotional implementations to assess their effectiveness. The process of analyzing a product allows the company to identify which areas of the plan should carry a heavier focus or which areas should be adjusted. The evaluation not only involves evaluating the company’s competitive position in its respective market but also to implement new strategies for its business goals.
1. The Marketing Mix is the primary element that differentiates social marketing from communication and advertising approaches with which it is often confused. When Coca Cola markets a new drink it must first design the product's color, taste, and consistency. It then prices that product to be competitive, places or distributes that product in places where people are most likely to desire it, and then they promote it, using a wide variety of approaches including prizes, events, publicity, advertising, and discounts. In social marketing, however, the product is often the desired behavior itself (“breastfeed your child at work”) and/or some supporting device or policy necessary to make the behavior possible (a breastfeeding room in a modern office complex); price is the embarrassment and time required to breastfeed, while promotion is all the activities the company and coworkers take to reduce the embarrassment and support the behavior.
Social marketing aims to develop and integrate marketing concepts with other approaches to, in turn, influence behaviors that benefit individuals and communities for the greater social good. In public health, many social marketing campaigns include a specific behavior change component. For instance, a HIV testing social marketing campaign uses messages to convince people to get an HIV test.
For public sector agencies, social marketing is often used as a way to encourage people to follow rules and regulations, and practice general safe behaviors. For example, police departments campaign with slogans such as “Buckle up for life” and “Click it or ticket” to encourage people to wear their seat belts—showing either the positive rewards for this action (saving lives) or the negative consequences for ignoring the law (getting a traffic ticket).
Disney initially stated they wouldn’t exceed one million in donations, but ended up donating two million after the campaign blew up. #ShareYourEars campaign garnered 420 million social media impressions, and increased Make-A-Wish’s social media reach by 330%. The campaign is a powerful example of using an internet marketing strategy for a good cause. #ShareYourEars raised brand awareness, cultivated a connected online community, and positively affected Disney’s brand image.
Once you've protected your prospecting pool, maximize your affiliate program by working with the best and leaving the rest. As the old 80/20 adage implies, most of your revenue will come from a very small percentage of your affiliates. Because it can be time-consuming to manage a larger affiliate network, consider selecting only a few companies initially, and interview them before signing them on. Affiliates are an extension of your sales force and represent your online brand, so choose partners carefully.
Hashtags are essential to describe your content as well as to boost the organic reach of your social media campaign. Hashtag use varies according to the social media site. For Facebook, use no more than one hashtag. On Twitter, two hashtags are best for engagement. On Instagram, use a minimum of 9 and up to 30. Not sure which hashtags to use? Hire a social media expert to find the most effective hashtags for your social media platform so your content can get found.
The terms “social media” and “social marketing” are often used interchangeably, and while it’s easy to see how it happens, it’s important to understand that these two terms mean very different things. Certainly, social media and social marketing can work together, but grasping their differences will save you from having egg on your face in any marketing discussion. 
Speaking of what they termed "social change campaigns", Kotler and Ned Roberto introduced the subject by writing, "A social change campaign is an organized effort conducted by one group (the change agent) which attempts to persuade others (the target adopters) to accept, modify, or abandon certain ideas, attitudes, practices or behavior." Their 1989 text was updated in 2002 by Philip Kotler, Ned Roberto and Nancy Lee.[33] In 2005, University of Stirling was the first university to open a dedicated research institute to Social Marketing,[34] while in 2007, Middlesex University became the first university to offer a specialized postgraduate programme in Health & Social Marketing.[35]

What Works in Youth HIV is operated by JSI, a public health management consulting and research organization dedicated to improving the health of individuals and communities around the world. From July 1, 2015 through June 30, 2018, the Adolescent HIV/AIDS Prevention National Resource Center was provided financial support through a cooperative agreement awarded by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) under grant number MAIAH000001-01-00, with funding from the HHS Secretary’s Minority AIDS Initiative Fund. The content and conclusions on this website are those of the author/s and do not necessarily represent the official positions or policies of OAH, HHS, or the U.S. Government.
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Cost per mille requires only that the publisher make the advertising available on his or her website and display it to the page visitors in order to receive a commission. Pay per click requires one additional step in the conversion process to generate revenue for the publisher: A visitor must not only be made aware of the advertisement but must also click on the advertisement to visit the advertiser's website.
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