I started a blog which I plan to monetize only through affiliate marketing and my own products, no ads. I’ve been working on building an audience for my blog, for about 1 year and a half, many people think is maybe too much time, but I just want to make sure that I build enough trust with my readers before I start to try to make them buy something.
Social marketing can be confused with commercial marketing. A commercial marketer may only seek to influence a buyer to purchase a product. Social marketers have more difficult goals. They want to make potentially difficult and long-term behavior changes in target populations, which may or may not involve purchasing a product. For example, reducing cigarette smoking or encouraging use of condoms have difficult challenges to overcome that go beyond purchasing decisions.
For large commercial organizations, social marketing is often an effective way to encourage interest, participation, and donations for charitable foundations they support. One example is the Nike Foundation, which is working to help developing countries prosper through a campaign called The Girl Effect—using thought-provoking commercials that tell a story through text and music to gain Facebook fans and raise awareness for this cause.
The online marketing practices mentioned above cannot provide the best yields if you don't have campaign goals. You must set clear goals to help you measure the success of your campaign. These goals may include sales, leads, page visitors, comments, reviews, downloads and any other thing you hope to achieve. Without clear goals, it can be difficult to know how you are doing.
Managing a social marketing campaign might look fairly simple--like you're just putting up more posters to raise awareness of the lead poisoning problem in your community, for example. In reality, however, it's much more than that. Social marketing is no less than a shift in how you view and run your program or organization. It can be a very effective approach, but it's one with many details to consider.
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As Phil Kotler points out in his book Social Marketing - Strategies for Changing Public Behaviour, campaigns for social change are not a new phenomenon. They have been waged from time immemorial. In Ancient Greece and Rome, campaigns were launched to free slaves. In England during the Industrial Revolution, campaigns were mounted to abolish debtor prisons, grant voting rights to women, and to do away with child labour. Notable social reform campaigns in nineteenth-century America included the abolition, temperance, prohibition and suffragette movements, as well as a consumer movement to have governments regulate the quality of foods and drugs.
Websites and services based on Web 2.0 concepts—blogging and interactive online communities, for example—have impacted the affiliate marketing world as well. These platforms allow improved communication between merchants and affiliates. Web 2.0 platforms have also opened affiliate marketing channels to personal bloggers, writers, and independent website owners. Contextual ads allow publishers with lower levels of web traffic to place affiliate ads on websites.[citation needed]
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