A call to action is the centerpiece of a social marketing campaign. People want to know what to do, not what to think. Social marketing is skeptical of the notion that information leads to behavior change—although we recognize that in the case of a highly salient consequence (infant death), an information campaign on SIDS which promotes a simple but effective behavior (place the infant on his/her back to sleep and avoid Sudden Infant Death Syndrome), there is convincing evidence that information alone can effect large scale behavior.
You should also remember that planning is about the results, not the plan itself. A marketing plan must be measured by the results it produces. The implementation of your plan is much more important than its brilliant ideas or massive market research. You can influence implementation by building a plan full of specific, measurable and concrete plans that can be tracked and followed up. Plan-vs.-actual analysis is critical to the eventual results, and you should build it into your plan.
Internet marketing specialists help businesses promote their products and services using online marketing strategies. This can include email marketing, social media, search engine optimization (SEO), and more. The internet marketing specialist might act as a consultant, assessing the businesses' current situation, identifying strategies, setting up systems, and then turning over the actual marketing tactics to the business. Or he might be hired to implement and manage the Internet marketing plan on-going.
Social marketing campaigns can change health behaviour and behavioural mediators, but the effects are often small.5 For example, antismoking campaigns, such as the American Legacy Foundation's Truth campaign, can reduce the number of people who start smoking and progress to established smoking.16 From 1999 to 2002, the prevalence of smoking in young people in the US decreased from 25.3% to 18%, and the Truth campaign was responsible for about 22% of that decrease.16
In November 1994, CDNow launched its BuyWeb program. CDNow had the idea that music-oriented websites could review or list albums on their pages that their visitors might be interested in purchasing. These websites could also offer a link that would take visitors directly to CDNow to purchase the albums. The idea for remote purchasing originally arose from conversations with music label Geffen Records in the fall of 1994. The management at Geffen wanted to sell its artists' CD's directly from its website but did not want to implement this capability itself. Geffen asked CDNow if it could design a program where CDNow would handle the order fulfillment. Geffen realized that CDNow could link directly from the artist on its website to Geffen's website, bypassing the CDNow home page and going directly to an artist's music page.[14]
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